archiemcphee:

Some say that the best way to overcome a phobia is to face the fear head-on. They also say this should be done gradually, so this swaying glass-bottomed bridge might be best left for the advanced stages of conquering acrophobia. The photos alone are enough to make our palms sweaty.

The hair-raising suspension bridge is located 180 meters (590 feet) above a valley floor in Pingjiang County, in the Hunan province of southern China. Suspended between two rocky peaks, the bridge measures 300 meters (984 feet) long and, yes, it really does tend to sway in the breeze.

But don’t worry about freaking out before you even get halfway across. Specially trained staff are on hand to assist visitors in need of emotional support and encouragement in order to complete the thrilling/terrifying journey across the glass bridge.

Yun Ku, a 23-year-old who did the walk, said: “I was fine at first but by the time I was a third of the way across I just went weak at the knees. I had to go back when it started to move and needed a lot of coaxing from my boyfriend. I thought I was going just melt on the spot. My legs wouldn’t work.”

[via The Telegraph and Metro.co.uk]

Hunan is a couple of hours away from where I’m at.  Hmmmm….or maybe I should send someone else I don’t really like there.  Hahahahaha.

(via wilwheaton)

reblogged travel

npr:

If your image of a computer programmer is a young man, there’s a good reason: It’s true. Recently, many big tech companies revealed how few of their female employees worked in programming and technical jobs. Google had some of the highest rates: 17 percent of its technical staff is female.
It wasn’t always this way. Decades ago, it was women who pioneered computer programming — but too often, that’s a part of history that even the smartest people don’t know.
The Forgotten Female Programmers Who Created Modern Tech
Photo: Courtesy of University of Pennsylvania

npr:

If your image of a computer programmer is a young man, there’s a good reason: It’s true. Recently, many big tech companies revealed how few of their female employees worked in programming and technical jobs. Google had some of the highest rates: 17 percent of its technical staff is female.

It wasn’t always this way. Decades ago, it was women who pioneered computer programming — but too often, that’s a part of history that even the smartest people don’t know.

The Forgotten Female Programmers Who Created Modern Tech

Photo: Courtesy of University of Pennsylvania

reblogged

newyorker:

The photographer Moises Saman spent the weekend documenting the protests in Hong Kong. He writes:

“My experience in Hong Kong could not have been more different than in Cairo, Tunis, Tripoli, and Hama. In the Arab world, state authorities did not think twice before using deadly force to quell the protests. … In Hong Kong, I observed astounding restraint by both the police and the protesters.”

All photographs by Moises Saman / Magnum

(Source: newyorker.com)

reblogged

Leaf art. (at Hilton Shenzhen Shekou Nanhai Hotel)

Leaf art. (at Hilton Shenzhen Shekou Nanhai Hotel)

In Bloom.  (at Hilton Shenzhen Shekou Nanhai Hotel)

In Bloom. (at Hilton Shenzhen Shekou Nanhai Hotel)

H is for… (at Hilton Shenzhen Shekou Nanhai Hotel)

H is for… (at Hilton Shenzhen Shekou Nanhai Hotel)